Holiday Projects with 3M

I was recently asked by 3M, the makers of Scotch Blue Painter’s Tape (Visit ScotchBlue.com for more information. ), to come up with a fun and festive project using Scotch Blue Tape.  Now, I don’t know about you, but I LOVE glass jars.  Do you?  I love to use them around the house as part of your Christmas Decor and for all sorts of other things.  One can never have too many decorative jars.

christmas-crafts

So, I thought it would be fun to use some Scotch Blue Tape to dress up a couple of jars that I could then use as part of my Holiday Christmas Décor.  I wanted to make the jar fairly classic in design and color, so that I could use it year round for several different holidays and purposes.

christmas-crafts

I love how clean and simple the end product came out.  I can already see several ways to be able to use the jar.  Throw some a berry garland and some battery powered Christmas lights in the jar and set in the middle of a Pine Wreath to make a sparkly table centerpiece for your Holiday Table, or drop a candle inside (carefully) to create a festive mood in your home.  (I light my candle with a piece of spaghetti…true story!)

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The jar was really easy to make.  I simply took a nice glass jar and then used some Scotch Blue Tape to mark off areas that I did not want to be covered with paint.  Be sure to thoroughly clean the jar so that the tape and paint stick.

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Feel free to get creative here. Now, my personality likes clean and simple lines…but you could do a chevron pattern, plaid or skewed lines…or, punch some circles out of your tape with a round circle pattern and make polka-dots. You can also get creative with punch letters and other punch patterns.  There are so many ways you could use Scotch Blue Tape to dress up your jars.

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Be sure to cover all areas of the jar you do not want to be painted. Then take your favorite spray paint and spray your jar. Frosted glass spray would also be fun to use to! Let your jar sit for a few minutes (till it is no longer tacky) but not fully dry and then remove the tape. If you remove the tape when the paint is still damp, the paint will not pull up off of the jar.

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Christmas-Table-Decor

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The possibilities are endless.  I want to make another jar and fill it up with some red and white Christmas Candy for me to eat use as decor.

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Another fun idea would be to pretty up some jars and gift them filled with some Holiday goodness.  This is such an easy way to add some festive fun to the Holidays.  Be sure to stop back by The Idea Room later this week for a free printable for some Oatmeal Cookies in a Jar!

Neighbor-gift-ideasscotchblue, scotchblue painter's tape, painter's tape Disclosure:  This post is a collaboration with ScotchBlue™ Painter’s Tape. To join the creative community, visit the ScotchBlue Facebook Page.

You can also find out more about Scotch Blue here:
 

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Believe Sign

Hey guys! We have had a busy week around here.  My son is on the high school swim team and we are right in the middle of the swim season.  So my mom duties have pushed aside this blog thingy ;)…as it should!  But I found  some time to finally share with you this BELIEVE sign.  It, along with this Vintage Crate, are my favorite DIY Christmas decorations that I have made so far.

DIY-Christmas-decorations

I actually bought this board over two years ago with the idea of this project in mind but I never actually found the time to get around to making it.  So it sat in my attic waiting patiently for me ;).  I picked the board up from my local Bennion Crafts and it was already this fabulous red color with the fun edging.

DIY-Christmas-decorations

I cut out the word BELIEVE on my Silhouette CAMEO and then drew little circles where I wanted the Christmas lights to go.  Make sure they are evenly spaced to get the best overall look.  Take a hole punch and punch out the dots where the lights will be.

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*IMPORTANT–Be sure to count the number of lights you have on your string of Christmas lights.  You want to be sure you have enough lights for each hole.  AND…make sure that the lights will fit from one hole to the next.  There were a couple of spots that I had to skip a light so the wire was long enough to reach the next hole.  Does that make sense?  Check and double check.  And for best results it would be nice to make sure you have a few leftover lights and the end…just in case.  You can always hide those lights behind your finished sign.

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I traced the letters onto the wood and then painted the letters white.  I chose not to spray paint my sign since it was snowing the day I made it ;).  Then after the sign has dried, you can put your punched letter “stencil” on the board and use a pencil to mark where the holes should be drilled.

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Take a drill bit that is the same size of your Christmas lights and drill holes where each light will be.

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Then comes the fun part…Place the lights so that the plug is on the end where you need it to be as far as where you will be plugging it in.  Then insert the lights into each hole.  You will want to use some duct tape to securely hold the light in place so that they don’t fall out of the hole.  My kids LOVED helping with this part.  You can see what a great job they did on the back of the sign!  But no worries, no one will be the wiser once the sign is turned around.

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I LOVE how it turned out!  And I love it even more at night!  Don’t you just love this time of year?  I love Christmas lights and I love how cozy they make your home feel.

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Christmas Vintage DIY Crate

This month, as part of the Lowe’s Creative Blogger team, we were given the challenge to create some Holiday décor items.  I always enjoy these challenges because it gives me an opportunity to finally get some of these projects that are constantly swirling around my head, out of my head and in my home.

vintage-crate

And I am especially excited about this project…a vintage DIY crate!  I have actually spent some time looking around for some of these crates but couldn’t find exactly what I wanted and so I had toyed with the idea of making my own.  But wasn’t quite sure how to go about it.

DIY-vintage

So with this month’s #LowesCreator challenge, I decided that this would be the perfect time to try my hand at making a “vintage” crate.

I picked up some tounge and groove pine boards at Lowe’s and cut off the “tounges” and “grooves” by simply running the boards through our saw.  I picked these boards because they are really thin and inexpensive.

For the front and back of the crate, I cut 6 of these boards so that I had:

6 boards that measured 3.5 inches by 24 inches. 

They are 1/4 inch thick.

Then I made 6 more boards that measured 3.5 inches by 7.5 inches for the sides of the crate.

DIY-Vintage-Crate

Then I cut a piece of a pine board 7 x 24 inches.  This is the bottom of the crate.

Then to make the corner supports of the box, I cut 4—7 inch pieces a of 1.5 x 1.5 board.

What…You don’t work in your pajamas? :) My little girl takes pretty good pictures…don’t you think?

Then you will need to nail your crate together. I didn’t use any wood glue on this project, but you can if you want.

I started with the bottom and one of the front pieces and nailed them together. Then I nailed on the back piece to the bottom.

Then you can nail on both sides. Be careful to hold your box exactly where you want it so that it maintains a nice rectangular shape.

DIY-Vintage-Crate 1

Then I nailed the corner supports in and finished nailing the other two front planks to the corner supports.  I chose to leave a tiny space in between each plank to give it a more vintage feel.

After the front is nailed, I added the side planks so that I could match them up with the front. When nailing these on, be sure to keep your corner pieces straight. This is very important to the overall finish of your vintage crate.

Then finally, you will nail the back planks on. This crate is made so that the sides of the crate planks actually show on the front and the back of the crate. I thought this would help with the overall vintage look.  Now your crate is done! Yay!!

Vintage-Crate

To add a label I simply printed out this old vintage stamp that I found in the online Silhouette store.  I transferred it over onto the wood with the old trick of drawing on the back of the design in pencil and then coloring over the top of it so that it ends up on the wood.  Pretty high tech!

Then you simply need to draw the design with a black Sharpie.

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Throw a layer of stain on your crate ( I used a walnut colored stain)…and you have a beautiful vintage DIY crate!

vintage-DIY

I was surprised at how easy this crate was to build.  And was really happy with the overall results.  I love being able to make something JUST the way I want.

I added some pine branches and a berry garland to glam it up and threw in a couple of candles.  As always be super careful when using candles.  And…since I took these pictures, I actually threw a string of white battery powered Christmas lights to give it some more holiday sparkle.

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When the holidays are over, I can replace what is in the crate so it can be in my home all year long.

Be sure to check out Lowes Creative Ideas and sign up for their free newsletter which is full of creative goodness.

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*I was given a Lowe’s gift card for the supplies to make this crate.  However all opinions and statements are mine.


Build Your Own Wooden Box

I shared with you earlier in the week this simple Thanksgiving Centerpiece I made for our Thanksgiving Table this year.  Today I want to give you some simple instructions so you can make this DIY Wood Box.  The great part about this is that it is a super easy project that can be whipped up in just a couple of hours.  And if you have never built anything this DIY Wood Box is a perfect beginner project.  You can do it…I promise!

how-to-build-a-wood-box

Materials you will need:

Two 5.5 inch pieces of 1 x 4 poplar wood boards (ends)

Two 31.5 inch pieces of 1 x 4 poplar wood boards (sides)

*(we used poplar wood because it takes stain better than pine, if you are painting it, pine should be fine…but remember pine can tend to shrink and may split easier when putting nails into)

30 inches of 1 x 6 a pine wood boards (base)

hammer

nails

wood glue

wood putty

clamps

sand paper

stain or paint

Polyurethane

Directions:

The overall dimensions of our finished box is 31.5 inches long x 7 inches wide x 3.5 inches tall.  Depending on your needs, you may want to adjust your measurements accordingly.

1.  Cut your wood base 30 inches in length.  We used a 1 x 6 pine board.

2.  Cut TWO end pieces of a 1 x 4 poplar wood board.  We cut them so that they were 5.5 inches to match the actual width of the pine board.

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3. Attach the end pieces to the ends of the base. Be sure that they sit evenly with the base. Add some wood glue and then throw a couple of nails on each end of the 5.5 inch pieces. Let glue dry according to your glue’s drying time.

4.  Cut TWO side pieces of a 1 x 4 poplar wood board so that they measure 31.5 inches (which should fit flush with the ends of the box).  Attach to the sides of the base and the end pieces with some glue first and then some nails to secure the hold.  Use clamps if needed and allow your glue to dry.

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5. Fill nail holes with wood putty and let it dry. Sand down any excess wood putty and your box to smooth out any rough edges or spots.

6. Wipe your box down with a damp cloth to remove all dust.

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6. Now you are ready to paint or stain your box. I decided to stain mine a darker color to go with my dark wood floors. I used a Minwax stain called Red Mahogany. I used a couple of coats to get the color I wanted. Then I added a couple of coats of a satin finish Polyurethane.

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These boxes are great because it can be used for so many other projects or home décor items.  You can also build one to fit perfectly in your own space by adjusting the measurements of the wood you use and cut.

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As always, I would love to see if any of you end up making one for your home!  Wouldn’t these also make a great Hostess or Christmas gift?  And if you have any wood scraps lying around like we did, this is a VERY inexpensive project!

How to paint a door

Recently I shared with you our updated porch as part of the Lowes Creative Blogger “curb appeal” challenge.  As part of it, I finally had the courage to paint my door black, which I have wanted to do for a long time now.  Today I would like to share with you and show you… how to paint a door.  Several of you had questions about the paint and the tools we used so I am going to try and answer all of them here.

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First off, I wanted to share a before picture with you so you can see the door before and after painting.  And yes…that is a Christmas wreath on my door…in May…(don’t judge…hehe)!

painted door 3  painted door before

My husband and I took a little trip to our Local Lowes store and talked to their paint department about the best paint for our front door.  With their recommendations we decided to go with an oil base paint for better durability and overall finish.  We chose the Rust-Olem brand in a satin black finish.

painted door 1  painted door

They also told us about Penetrol by Flood, which you can add to your paint which helps the paint not to dry so quickly which can help eliminate brush and roller marks.  This was really important to me as I wanted a nice smooth finish which can be hard sometimes when using a brush and a roller.  You could choose to spray your door with a paint sprayer but we don’t have one so that was not an option for us.

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Let’s get started:

1.  Wipe down door and wipe off any grease marks or stains.

2.  Remove the door hardware.  This is optional, but your painting will be easier without them.  We took ours off since we were replacing our 35 year old hardware.  Think about drying time if you are removing your door hardware though as your house will be unsecured when the door handle is off and when you can put your hardware back on.

3.  Lightly sand over surface of the door and prime if the door has any imperfections or areas that may need some attention.  Also you will need to do this if you are painting latex paint over an oil base or vice versa.

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4.  Tape off any areas you don’t want to get paint on like door hinges, windows, trim and door hardware.

5.  Use good paint tools.  We love the Quali-Tech Ultra Smooth High Density Foam roller and the angled Purdy paint brushes.  I used the 2 inch size for my door.

6.  When you start the actual painting with the primer (if you are priming) and the paint, be sure to paint the door panels in the proper direction.  This will help with the overall smoothness in the final painted finish.

7.  I start painting the inside of the panels shown here in the red and the #1.  Paint in a circle in the direction of the arrows with your paint brush.  Be sure to paint slowly and watch for drips which can happen easily in these sections…especially the corners.  Then move on to the next panel until all the insides of the panels (the squares and rectangles) have been painted.

8.  Now quickly move on to painting the raised panels and the middle stripe of the door in blue marked with the #2.  I use the roller for these flat sections.  Roll them smoothly and make sure that where you end and pick up the roller that there is not a big thick line of paint.  Be sure to lightly roll this out so that there will not be a noticeable line when finished.

9.  Now roll the area horizontally between the top and bottom panels.  Be sure to following the direction of the arrows for the green section marked #3.

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How To Paint a Door

10.  Now for the final section, you will need to paint around the entire outside of the door following the yellow arrows marked with a #4.  Be sure to paint vertically on the outside left and right sides and then horizontally on the top and bottom areas.

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Your door will need to dry completely in between painting your different coats of paint.  We needed a total of three coats of paint for it to be the nice finish we had been wanting.  I made sure to paint the door when I could spend all day at home for a couple of days.  I painted the door first thing in the morning so that it had time to dry all day long before putting the dead bolt back on at night so we could lock it up.

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Then we added the finishing touches with some nice new hardware from Lowe’s which included the new dead bolt and door handle and a matching kick plate.  I LOVE the extra touch the silver kick plate added to the overall look, plus it covered up some dings and dents that were in the bottom of our door.

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I threw on some house numbers which I cut with my Silhouette CAMEO to finish it off.

painted black door

And…I finally put away the Christmas wreath.  I figured it was probably about time…don’t you? Ha!  I whipped up this other wreath with some stuff I already had on hand and will share with you how I did that in a later post.

painted door wreath

I feel like the color of someone’s front door can tell a lot about their personality.  What about you?  What color is your front door?  Is it the color you want it to be?  If you could paint it any color you wanted, what color would you paint your front door?

How to make café shelves

I hope you all had a great and relaxing Mother’s Day Weekend. We were lucky enough to have my Brother-In-Law and his family stay with us this weekend. Things were a bit crazy considering that there are 11 kids between us ages 14 to 3…!! But we had a great time playing with them. Now it is time to get back to work.

I had a lot of you comment about the café shelves we have in our newly updated Laundry Room. We made them and so can you. The best part is that they are super easy to make. Win Win for sure.  So if you would like some in your home keep reading…

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How to Make Café Shelves:

1.  Find a pair  of Shelf Corner Brackets.

I used some from Lowe’s that we found in the molding aisle.  We went with the 7 inch size because that is the size that fit the best with the shelf we had chosen.  For one shelf you will need 2 brackets.  If you are making 2 shelves like we did you will need 4 brackets.

2.  Find or make a wall shelf. 

We happened to find a nice pre-made shelf at Home Depot.  We loved the chunkier style of it and the that it has some nice decorative molding along the edges.  It was in the closet and storage aisle.

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3.  Spray paint your shelves your desired color.

Spray paint was the easiest and fastest option.  Plus—I LOVE spray paint.  It makes me super happy.

cafe shelves

4. Glue your corner brackets on the BOTTOM of your shelf.

Make sure that the back of the bracket is lined up perfectly with the back of your shelf. So that when the shelf is on the wall, there will be no gap between the wall and the bracket. You want them to look like they are holding up the shelf.

We used Gorilla Wood Glue.

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5.  Be sure to adjust the bracket and place it in from the edge of the shelf.

We measured ours so that it was set in 4 inches from the side end on both ends of the shelf.

cafe shelves 2

6.  Let Wood Glue dry completely.

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We decided to make our shelves the same size but had debated about making the top shelf a bit smaller than the other one.  Ultimately we decided to go with two of the same size shelves.  I am really happy with how they turned out and feel like the brackets give the shelf a lot of fun character and interest.

Have any of you made any café shelves or something similar for your home? I would love to see them.  I would also love to see if any of you end up making some of these.  I always love hearing from you guys out there!

Linking up here:

Today’s Creative Blog

how to take your baseboards from small to tall

I recently shared with you our newly updated Laundry room. And I am loving it. Still a few things to get finished in there like a window treatment and some fun basket labels and such.  One of the updates we made was to make our existing baseboards taller.  Today I am going to share with you how to make baseboards that are short taller with an easy trick.

laundry-room

The baseboards in our laundry room were in fairly good shape still…considering…and we didn’t want to take the time to pull them out and add new ones with all the other projects we had on our to do list! So we just updated them by adding a small thin piece of decorative molding to the top.

before laundry room pic wm

This update is a really easy and inexpensive way to get the nicer look of the taller baseboards that don’t come in the standard house.  We simply took a piece of wood that measured 1 inch and used that as our spacer to get the molding to the height we wanted.

how-to-make-baseboard

We measured and cut each piece of molding to the proper length with 45 degree angles at the corners.  Then attached them to the wall with a nail gun in several spots.  We do not like to use Liquid Nails at our house as we never know when we I are/am going to get a bee in my bonnet to change something around.  Nail holes are much easier to repair than a wall full of Liquid Nail glue!

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When the molding is attached, you will then need to go and fill the cracks and crevices with white painters caulk. So easy, but a really important step to the overall finished look of your baseboards.

how-to-make-baseboard

When it has properly dried you can paint your baseboards.  We painted ours with two coats to give it a super nice finish!  Just tape the wall and the floor with some Frog Tape or Blue Painter’s Tape to give you a nice crisp edge.

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And ta-da! An easy, (almost instant) DIY improvement.  I just love the look of the taller baseboards.  It really does make a big difference in the overall look of the room.

how-to-make-baseboard

*Update—I have had several of you email me and ask me what our paint colors are in this room.

The wall color is Revere Pewter by Benjamin Moore.

I do not have the paint name for our trim as we have been painting our trim this color for 8 years.  But I do have the paint code which is below.  We use a high gloss finish on our trim as well.

trim paint tag

What do you think? Do you have any rooms you would like to give your baseboards a height lift?

Laundry room Update & Lowes giveaway

This Giveaway is now CLOSED!

Hey guys! I am so happy to be able to share with you today an update on our Laundry Room.  This room has been a work in progress for WAY too long.  I shared with you in January mid way through our progress and asked for your advice. Thanks for everyone who shared. I did read each and everyone and even got a couple of emails with some great advice that actually helped push me in the right direction…so thank you.  I have the best readers! 

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We built the washer and dryer platform in January early this year.

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We started the actual remodeling process on this room way back before Thanksgiving when we painted our lockers white.   I was really worried about painting ALL the cabinets white in this room, so I was struggling with trying to decide where to go next but knew that I was not happy with the final overall look of the room.

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Then, we got crazy busy with the remodel of our kitchen and getting our wood flooring installed during December, January and February.  So this room just sat in limbo…waiting patiently (ha!) for its turn.

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Well, I got the perfect burst of energy to finally get this room ship shape during April after Snap of course! As you know, I am one of Lowe’s Creative Bloggers and our challenge for this month was to give a room a new facelift.  Just the motivation I needed to finally tackle this room once and for all.

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And I am really happy with the final outcome.  There are still a few things to get just right…like the items on the shelves and the right window treatment…but overall I am loving it.  I am so glad we were brave enough to paint the cabinets all white.  The room is so bright and fresh now!

laundry room 2 wm

Here is what we did for the update:

  • Added Crown Moldings and painted
  • Updated Baseboards and made them taller…tutorial post coming soon
  • Painted Black Cabinets White
  • Added new cabinet hardware
  • Made some shelf with corner brackets and wood…tutorial post coming soon
  • Framed in new window with molding
  • New light fixtures
  • New door knobs on closet doors

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Laundry Room Before

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Laundry Room Mid Remodel

Here are some other earlier updates we have made to this room if you are interested in checking them out as well.

    Well, that is not all…One lucky Idea Room Reader is going to win a $100 Gift Card to Lowe’s as part of Lowe’s Makeover Challenge.
    To enter: Simply leave me a comment on this post and if you have a room you would like to make over, I would love to know which room and why.
    That’s it! One comment per person please.

*Giveaway is open to US residents age 18 and over only and closes Friday, May 4 at noon MST.  Winner will be chosen at random and has 24 hours to respond or a new winner will be chosen!

Be sure to head on over for your FREE Subscription to Lowe’s Creative Ideas Magazine:

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**I was given a gift card by Lowe’s to create my Lowe’s Makeover Challenge this month.  However all opinions and statements are my own.

Flower pot bird house

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This month as part of the Lowe’s Creative Challenge of which I am a team member of, we were challenged to make a DIY Bird Retreat.  I personally did not want a “normal” birdhouse and needed something a bit more practical and realistic for my own personal preferences.  So I decide to make a Flower Planter Bird House…sort of a two in one combo.

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I had a few different designs floating around in my head and headed to Lowe’s to see just what I could actually turn into a reality.  I knew I wanted a WHITE planter but was looking for just the right style.

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I picked up this almond colored flower plantar, some plastic moldings, potting soil, white silicon, bird seed and some flowers.

flower box bird house wm

We used some scrap wood from previous projects at home to build the square base which became our birdhouse.  Then we added some moldings at the top and bottom to give it a little bit of a customized look.  We drilled a hole for the birds and added a little tray to hold some bird seed for our feathered friends to enjoy.

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We painted the birdhouse box with some exterior paint and spray painted the plantar box white to match.  I am really pleased with how it turned out and love having a nice pop of color out on the back porch.  I think I may make a matching set so that they can be on either side of the stairs that you can see to the left of the photo.

Be sure to stop back by if you would like to see how we made this.  I will be sharing the full tutorial later.

flower box bird house 3wm

Thanks to Lowe’s for helping us get motivated to get this project done! You can find Lowe’s Creative Ideas on FB for more great ideas.  They also have a Lowe’s Creative Ideas blog…and you might recognize one or more faces there now…Smile

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flower box bird house 4wm

And…just in case you missed last month’s Lowes Challenge…you can find it here.

Disclosure: Lowe’s provided me with a gift card to showcase this project this month as part of their Lowe’s Creative ideas Bloggers team.

Towel rack tutorial

As promised we are sharing how we made our customized Towel Rack as part of our Lowe’s Creative Ideas Blogger challenge last month.  The tutorial is fairly involved but hopefully if you are interested in making one for yourself you can follow along fairly easily.

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Pin It

We began our cabinet design with basic sketch of what we wanted it to look like. We then measured the space of where the cabinet was to go and also measured the cabinet door (we had previously bought.  From that information, we figured out the dimensions of the cabinet.

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For instance, the door was 20 inches tall and 24 inches wide and we wanted 3 inches of face frame around the door (and also needed to allow for a 1/8 inch space/gap between the door and the frame). So…the bottom portion of the cabinet ended up being 26 1/4 inches tall, 30 1/4 inches wide, and 8 inches deep.

Materials Needed:

  • 1 5/8 inch furniture grade piece of plywood (4×8 feet)
  • 2 eight foot pieces of 3.5 inch x 3/4 inch MDF boards
  • 1 four foot length of crown molding
  • 30 feet of door jamb molding
  • 2 hooks for towels
  • 2 zinc narrow hinges
  • 2 friction lid supports
  • 1 cabinet door pull
  • 4 finial feet
  • gorilla wood glue
  • wood filler
  • sanding block
  • painter’s caulk
  • primer
  • paint
    • pre-made cabinet door (ours was 20 x 24 inches) OR make your own with a piece of wood and some decorative trim

We started with a 5/8 inch furniture grade piece of plywood (4×8 feet). The first cut was for the back (29 inches wide by 60 inches tall). So when you attached the 5/8 side panels, the total width was needed 30 ¼ inches. I then cut the other parts of the bottom cabinet (leaving the upper portion for later once I could see what remained to be cut).

towel rack tutorial7  towel rack tutorial10

I added an extra layer of plywood on the interior of the cabinet (sides and bottom) to make it sturdier and to allow for the attaching of hinges (you will notice that on the extra piece on the sides is slightly shorter than the piece we attached it to because we only had that length of wood piece remaining from 4×8 foot sheet we originally started with…and the gap would not be seen at the top of that section).

towel rack tutorial11  towel rack tutorial12

Top of Cabinet – I cut 3/8” wider than the width and depth to allow for the 3/8” molding (which will be attached later to frame the cabinet) to be flush on the sides and front.

towel rack tutorial 13  towel rack tutorial 14

Attach the face frame to the front of the cabinet. 

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Cut outside edge of molding at a 45 degree angle so that the edges will be flush with the sides.

towel rack tutorial 18  towel rack tutorial 19

We used 3 ½ inch wide MDF boards to construct the sides and top of the upper section.

towel rack tutorial 21

We added a second piece of MDF on the top to allow for a better place to attach the moldings. Cut molding to size once the sides and top had been glued and nailed (most of the moldings covered the nail holes).

towel rack tutorial 22  towel rack tutorial 23

Determined where to put the towel hooks, and then put a cross piece of MDF to allow for more wood to screw the hooks into.

towel rack tutorial 24

We attached the second strip of wood behind the face frame so that it would drop down and provide a place for the cabinet door to rest and close on (see second picture below).  We just used a left over piece of wood and extended it down an inch.  We attached the wood with gorilla wood glue and used some clamps to hold it in place while it dried.

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Then measured and cut decorative moldings to size (attached these molding with only wood glue since the back was only 5/8 inches thick and nails would have protruded through the back of the cabinet. All other molding were attached with glue and nails).

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Then we attached some decorative trim moldings to cover up the plywood edges and to give the cabinet a nice finished look.  These were glued on as well.

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We then attached the hinges and friction support.  You can see that were the friction support attaches to the interior of the cabinet, we had to add a 1 1/2 inch thick piece of wood (with wood glue and clamps) to the back of the face frame.

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To attach the finial feet, we drilled pilot holes into the four corners of the bottom of the cabinet.  The holes were slightly smaller than the finial feet screw but allowed for a secure fit once we screwed in the feet.  One suggestion, to allow for starting the screw into the smaller holes, we rotated the drill in a circular pattern as we pulled the drill bit back out of the finished pilot hole.  This created a little bigger opening at the start of the pilot hole and allowed for an easier screwing-in process.

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And…to answer your questions…you can find all of the following here:

Update Builder Grade Cabinets with finial feet.

Painting Bathroom cabinets white tutorial.

The yellow rug was painted by me…Painted Rug tutorial!

DIY Trumeau Mirror (not pictured)

Framed in Builder’s Grade Mirror

Original Customized Towel Rack post.

Towels are from Anhropologie.

Hair Appliance Tool Holder purchased here.

Hair Appliance Cabinet Tutorial

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