Kitchen Wood Sign

*This is a collaboration with Cricut.  However all opinions and statements are mine and mine alone.

We are in full swing summer over here.  Are you?  I was looking forward to having my schedule slow down a bit so we could have some lazy days and so we could sleep in.  I have managed to sleep in twice.  I have spent the last two days just recuperating from summer and everyone’s different schedules.  I feel like the older my kids get, the crazier life is…can anyone relate?

Anyways, that is why things have been a little more quiet here on the blog.  I got my act together to finally share with you this wood sign that we made for kitchen.

grocery-sign

I love pairing older, vintage items with new items.  I am not quite sure how that developed, but it seems that my style has been heading in this direction for a while now and I just love it.  Of course, I couldn’t find any real vintage signs that I LOVED and that I could afford, so of course I decided to make one.

I used my vintage Dr. Pepper Crate that holds my spices as an inspiration for how to make this kitchen wood sign look aged.

To make a similar sign you will need the following materials:

  • pine board (4 ft long by 7.5 inches)
  • wood stain
  • white paint
  • red paint (or paint color of your choice)
  • sand paper
  • paint brushes
  • a stencil or vinyl letter stickers
  • picture hangers (or a wire and two screws)

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Cut your board to the dimensions that will work with your space.  Our board measured 4 feet in length by  ft in height.  Sometimes your hardware stores will cut the wood for you if you ask nicely and they are not super busy!

Sand the surfaces and the edges of your board.  Stain your wood and wipe off the excess stain with a dry cloth.  Let it dry overnight.

Paint the board white over your stain.  Let it dry completely.

Cut out your vinyl letters on your vinyl cutting machine.  I used my Cricut Explore machine to make the GROCERY letters.  If you have a Cricut Machine you can make this project RIGHT NOW by clicking on the MAKE IT NOW button below.

If you don’t have access to a machine, you can print out the letters on your printer and make an old fashioned stencil or use freezer paper.  The font I used is called Old Style.

grocery-sign 6

Place the stickers or the stencil on your board.  Paint over the stickers with the paint color you want your sign to be…in our case it was red paint.  Before the paint dries carefully peel up the vinyl letters.  I found the sooner you can peel them up, the better chance you have of getting smooth lines.  Otherwise, the paint can dry and cause tears that you might have to touch up.

grocery-sign 5

After the stickers are peeled up, let the paint dry completely.  Overnight works best so that the paint has fully set before you sand the board.

Now distress your board by sanding it all over in the areas you want the stain to show through.  Distress it to your style and taste.

grocery-sign 2

I like a fair amount of distressing.  My rule of thumb is to start out with less because you can always go back and add more distressing rather than fixing something that is too distressed!

Now attach the picture hangers to the back (or a good old wire with two screws) so that you can hang the sign where you want it on your wall.

vintage-sign
I love the little splash of color it adds to our fairly white and bright kitchen.  I also love that it ties in with the distressed Dr. Pepper Crate Spice Rack.  And, this project is a fairy simple and inexpensive one.  All you really need to buy is the board since most people have stain and paint laying around their houses.

DIY-kitchen-decor
Want to make this project now?  Click on the button below to be taken directly to the project!

cricut make it now button

grocery-sign

What kind of sign would you want to put in your kitchen?

Interested in checking out the rest of our kitchen remodel? Check out this post we shared earlier.

Kitchen Tour

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*This is a collaboration with Cricut.  However all opinions and statements are mine and mine alone.  I was given compensation and or product for this post.  But am responsible for all my own opinions.  



Succulent Planters

It’s that time again…time to share with you this month’s Lowe’s Creator project. The theme this month was “pop of color” and I thought some simple succulent planters would be a perfect touch to our back deck decor.

succulent-planters

This project is seriously SOOO easy.  And if you love succulents like I do, this is a fun way to display them in and around your home.  All you need to do is pick up some succulents and clay pots from Lowe’s.  I spray painted the pots with Valspar’s Golden Maize in a Satin finish and then let them dry completely overnight.

decorating-with-succulents

Then I used my Cricut Explore machine to cut out the herb names in vinyl lettering which I used as a stencil and stenciled the letters in black paint.  I like doing the stencils rather than just using black vinyl because it gives the word an older, vintage look.  If you don’t have vinyl cutting machine you can stencil the old fashioned way and make your own stencil with an exact-o knife or stick some letter stickers on the pot BEFORE spray painting it your color desired and then peel off the stickers.  (Paint black on the pot before you place the stickers on).

herb-pots

That is seriously all there is to it.  I also took a light sandpaper and kind of roughed up the paint on the pots so that they aren’t totally perfect looking! I love them!  These would also make a fantastic teacher’s gift or Mother’s Day gift!

succulent

Have you had a chance to sign up for Lowe’s Creative Ideas Magazine. It’s FREE and offers a bunch of DIY inspiration. Go ahead and connect with Lowes Creative Ideas to find a lot more fun and creative ideas.

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clay-pots

*Disclosure–In accordance with the FTC Guidelines, I am disclosing that I received compensation from Lowe’s and Cricut for my time and participation in the Lowe’s Creative Ideas Influencer Network. However, all opinions and statements are mine and mine alone.



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